Countercultural

“Often a work of God comes with two edges, great joy and great pain, and in that matter-of-fact response Mary embraced both. She was the first person to accept Jesus on His own terms, regardless of the personal cost.”– Philip Yancey

During this Advent season, we think about Jesus coming to this earth to walk among humans in a world that was unsettled at best. What do we learn by observing his sojourn on our planet?

In a world whose leaders were angry at him for doing good, he was angry at sin.

In a world filled with selfishness, he served with kindness.

In a world of competing voices, he spoke confidently and quietly – often to just a few.

In a world of bullies, he was gentle.

In a world of crowds and chaos, he invited his disciples to come away with him to rest.

In a world that demanded retribution, he was forgiving.

In a world that valued silver and gold, he took pleasure in the sparrows.

In a world of hurry, noise, and threats, he said not to be anxious about anything.

In a world of disparity, he advised a man to sell his possessions and give to the poor.

In a world of homes and families, he had no place to lay his head.

Jesus came to show us how to live in an upside-down world. A world that doesn’t know him or his ways. In a world of despair and depression, he challenges us to live with expectancy and hope and, by doing so, our countercultural lives will point others to him. What better time to do that than when we celebrate his birth?

We have seen his glory, the glory of the one and only Son, who came from the Father, full of grace and truth.” – John 1:14b

6 thoughts on “Countercultural

  1. Absolutely wonderful truths! Ruth

    On Wed, Dec 22, 2021 at 5:05 AM Walking Together on Holy Ground wrote:

    > beverlyvankampen posted: ” “Often a work of God comes with two edges, > great joy and great pain, and in that matter-of-fact response Mary embraced > both. She was the first person to accept Jesus on His own terms, regardless > of the personal cost.”- Philip Yancey During this Ad” >

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Bev:

    Thank you for the staccato-poetic contrasts set up between the world and Our Lord’s character and behavior.

    When I hear the term “counter culture” I think of Richard Niebuhr’s enduring book Christ and Culture. In it the author shows how Fundamentalists have championed Christian holiness against “the world or worldliness” (Christ AGAINST Culture); the Roman Catholic motivation in different eras to permeate government and the arts (Christ IN Culture); the Liberal denominations to see Christ as the invention of man (Christ IS Culture) and the final appeal for Christ as the TRANSFORMER of Culture.

    Your article is so much more specific and personal. Thanks.

    Have a blessed Christmas, Bev.

    Dennis

    Liked by 2 people

  3. I had no idea there were so many interpretations of what it means to be countercultural! Thanks for sharing this, Dennis. I appreciate your thoughts and the additional understanding they add to what was posted. Joy and blessings of the season . . .

    Liked by 1 person

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